KEGEL EXERCISES


Kegel exercises can often strengthen the pubococcygeus muscle.  This muscle, also called the PC muscle, stretches from the pubic bone to the tail bone.  The PC muscle plays a part in the function of urinating and ejaculating.

If you are urinating and you try to slow the flow of urine, that is the PC muscle you are tightening.  * Alternatively, if you insert your finger gently about 1/2 inch into your anus and try to grip or tighten around your finger, that is another way to identify the PC muscle.

Kegel exercises have been known to help some men with premature ejaculation and to assist others who desire a stronger orgasm or a more forceful ejaculation.  Some men who perform these kegel exercises on a regular basis have good results.  Others claim they are a waste of time.

A man can do kegel exercises at any time.  * The simplest way to perform kegel exercises is to squeeze and hold the muscle for a few seconds and then release. Multiple sets of these exercises a few times a day is what is recommended if one is trying to get better ejaculatory control or stronger ejaculations.

*  While we will certainly try to help all of our patients, as with any medical treatment, there is no guarantee of specific results, as results can and usually do vary from patient to patient. All numbers and time frames mentioned are approximate and may vary from patient to patient.

 
 

MEN'S MEDICAL NEW YORK, P.C.

MENSMEDICALNEWYORK.COM


 
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